The Ultimate Game of Thrones Book Tag

April’s book tag is brought to you courtesy of Clockwork Bibliophile. I don’t claim to be the biggest Game of Thrones fan, but I have read the first two novels in the epic saga, and I’m slowly working my way through the TV show.

1. “We do not sow”: A book you would not be willing to invest in
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling (1st Edition/1st Print)
Only because I don’t have a spare 30k. Cries. (I legitimately couldn’t think of a book that I wouldn’t buy).

2. “Fire and blood”: A book that produced strong emotions in you
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
Very few books make me cry, but this was one of them.

3. “Winter is coming”: Your favourite winter read
Dash and Lily’s Book of Dares by David Levithan and Rachel Cohn
This treasure hunt across New York City over the Christmas and New Year festive period is insanely cute and heartwarming.

4. “Family. Duty. Honour”: A book about strong family ties
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Cullens are one of the most tight-knit families in literature; they are genuinely willing to die for one another.

5. “Growing strong”: A book you had low expectations about but that grew on you
Foe by J.M. Coetzee
I had never heard of this book prior to it appearing on my reading list for my Masters degree, but I genuinely enjoyed the unexpected fantasy element incorporated within the realism.

6. “Ours is the fury”: A book that made you furious
The Fault In Our Stars by John Green
Quite simply, all of John Green’s books that I’ve read have made me furious. I just don’t get on with his writing, his characters or his endings.

7. “Unbowed. Unbent. Unbroken”: A book you have unwavering devotion to
Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman
I first read this novel when I was about eleven and everytime I re-read it I love it more.

8. “A Lannister always pays his debts”: A book you feel indebted to
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
Having met some of my best friends through the series, I will be eternally grateful to Potter.

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly Want To Read A Book

April 18: Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly Want To Read A Book
There isn’t often a time when I don’t want to read a book (at least to some degree), but there are occasions that increase my desire tenfold.

1. Watching a TV show/movie that mentions/shows a specific book
Gilmore Girls is a prime example: Rory is always reading something, and I always think “I want to read that. Like immediately.”

2. Watching a TV show/movie based on a book
The most recent example of this was when I watched The Martian. I already owned the book but hadn’t had any particular desire to read it. Fast-forward two hours and my nose was buried in the pages.

3. Seeing someone read a book in public
There’s something about watching someone with their nose in a book that instantly makes me want to do the same.

4. A new release by a favourite author
If JKR is releasing a new book, I’ll be up and ready to dive into it at midnight: time for a new novel now, isn’t it Jo?!

5. Sitting on a sunbed on holiday
Whenever I’m on holiday having a book in my hands is a prerequisite (even before the cocktail!) I fly through novels at the rate of knots whilst sitting in the sun.

6. When it has received stellar reviews on social media
If I’ve seen beautiful Instabooks photos, or read positive Goodreads reviews, I need that book.

7. When I should be doing something (arguably) more productive
Essay to write? Read a book.

8. After an author event
Frequently after meeting an author at an event or signing, if I haven’t already read the relevant book, it’s the first thing on my to-do-list.

9. It’s recommended to me by a friend, author or bookstore employee
In person recommendations are the best, and are a sure-fire way to get me to buy books.

10. Insane hype
The most recent example is Thirteen Reasons Why, which I devoured once it hit Netflix (before I began watching the show).

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Of The Most Unique Books I’ve Read

April 11: Top Ten Of The Most Unique Books I’ve Read
Whilst each book is unique, there are a number of books that stick in my mind as being especially different.

1. Nod by Adrian Barnes
Right up there with the strangest books I’ve ever read, this novel explores the concept of societal collapse due to the inability to sleep.

2. The One Memory Of Flora Banks by Emily Barr
This YA novel follows amnesiac Flora on her day to day life: it is full of repetition (understandable given the concept), but has a great plot twist.

3. A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness
This YA novel utilises magical realism in order to tackle important themes including bullying and death.

4. One by Sarah Crossan
Told in free verse, this YA story tells the tale of conjoined twins, their relationship, and the challenges they face.

5. Foe by J.M. Coetzee
The magical realism featured in this novel is incredibly thought provoking: concerning what is real and what is imagined, it is open to a vast array of interpretations.

6. The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
With one of the most interesting narrators, this series is amusing and holds relevant life lessons for both young and old.

7. We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
That plot twist! You think you know the direction this novel is heading in, and then, bam!

8. The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Whilst not an unusual YA dystopian concept, the lexis and syntax used in this book are wildly different to anything I’ve ever read before, which took a bit of getting used to.

9. The Curious Incident of the Dog In the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
Told from the perspective of a teenage boy with autism, the novel follows Christopher solving a crime.

10. Life With No Breaks by Nick Spalding
This entire book was written in one sitting: 24 hours in front of a computer is probably enough to drive anyone insane, and some of the tales in this autobiographical account are certainly hilarious.

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Reasons The Harry Potter Fandom Is The Best

April 4: Top Ten Reasons The Harry Potter Fandom Is The Best
This week’s Top Ten Tuesday is a Fandom related freebie, and considering my undying love for Harry Potter, it made perfect sense to base today’s post on everyone’s favourite boy wizard.

1. It remains as strong today as it was *almost* 20 years ago
A fifth of a century, can you believe it?! Millions of people have grown up with the series, and now we’re into a new era with Fantastic Beasts.

2. All the memes
There’s a meme/gif for every situation, and isn’t that just amazing?!

3. There are actual days in the calendar devoted to it
Harry Potter Book Night is in early February, July 31st is Harry/Jo’s birthday, September 1st draws immense crowds to Platform 9 3/4.

4. It inspired actual real-life theme parks
From Orlando to Japan, the Potter fandom is so die-hard that Universal created three Wizarding World theme parks. Which other fandom could do that?!

5. J.K. Rowling continues to interact with fans on Twitter
Because who doesn’t want to know what Jo’s Patronus is, or have her comment on crazy fan theories?!

6. The actors are still as invested in the series as they were 15 years ago
They still attend Potter conventions and special events, which has allowed me to meet a huge number of them (and even interview a handful!)

7. The insane amount of merchandise 
I myself am guilty of a little large splurge every now and again: from action figures to prop replicas, from cuddly toys to a full wizarding wardrobe, there is an entire array of merch available. *grabby hands*

8. Relevant themes
The series appeals to all most ages, genders, sexualities, races etc, with the themes of friendship and bravery playing pivotal roles.

9. Quidditch
How many books can claim to have invented a sport only to have it played all across the globe in reality?!

10. The friendships that were formed as a result
I met some of my best friends through the series, and that, I believe is true magic!

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Authors I’m Dying To Meet

March 28: Top Ten Authors I’m Dying To Meet
For the purpose of this particular blog post, I’m going to omit all the amazing authors I’ve already met and focus on those whom I’d love to meet in the future: here’s hoping I meet some at YALC 2017!
N.B. I’ve already met: J.K. Rowling, Robert Galbraith, Malorie Blackman, Audrey Niffenegger, Sarah J. Maas, E. Lockhart, V.E. Schwab, Patrick Ness, Alwyn Hamilton, Taran Matharu.

1. Stephenie Meyer (The Twilight Saga)
As one of my favourite series, I’d love to meet Stephenie and hear he talk about her characters – and get my huge stack of books signed.

2. Suzanne Collins (The Hunger Games)
The simple fact that she penned my favourite trilogy of all time is enough reason to want to meet her, right?!

3. Kass Morgan (The 100)
I did hear Kass speak on a panel at YALC 2016, but at that point I hadn’t immersed myself in the world of The 100, which I have since become obsessed with.

4. Lee Child (Killing Floor)
I adore the Jack Reacher novels – in fact I am currently reading #4 – so I’d love to hear Lee speak about crime/thrillers and get my entire collection signed.

5. Melinda Salisbury (The Sin Eater’s Daughter)
Although I haven’t begun to read this trilogy, I follow Melinda on Twitter and think she’s hilarious (I’ll get onto reading the series soon, I swear).

6. Anthony Horowitz (Stormbreaker)
Having been a fan of this series since I was a kid, (and having many other of his novels on my TBR) it would be somewhat of a childhood dream to meet Anthony.

7. Rick Riordan (Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief)
How Rick manages to write as many novels as he does simply astounds me – I just cannot keep up – though I’m more interested in the subject matter he writes about than his novels themselves.

8. Cecelia Ahern (PS, I Love You)
If I’m in the mood for an adult contemporary, I rarely reach any further than Cecelia Ahern: I love her worlds and characters, and have done for over a decade.

9. John Green (Paper Towns)
Despite not being the biggest John Green fan (I actually think he is overrated) I do enjoy perusing his YouTube channel, especially when he’s talking about the importance of books and reading.

10. Caitlin Moran (How To Be A Woman)
I think Caitlin is a wonderful feminist icon for young women, and I’d love to hear her speak on a panel about her experiences.

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Books To Read To While Away The Day

March 21: Top Ten Books To Read To While Away The Day
There’s little that I enjoy more than curling up in bed with a cup of green tea and devouring a good book, especially on a grey and rainy day (all too common in the UK).

1. Our Song by Dani Atkins
This contemporary follows the lives of four people over the course of many years, and how they all ended up in the same hospital one winter’s night.

2. Me Before You by Jojo Moyes
I adored the quirky main character and her developing relationship with her SO. Even better, this novel went in an entirely unexpected direction and was heart-breaking.

3. I Am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes
This beast of a thriller follows our hero across the globe as he searches for the person(s) responsible for a number of seemingly unconnected crimes.

4. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
In terms of immersive writing, Jane Eyre is fabulous. There’s plenty of character development, but where this novel really shines is in its vivid descriptions, most notably of the settings: perfect for a winter’s night.

5. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
This hard-hitting novel explores racism in America: I love that the story is told from the perspective of a child (because, let’s face it, kids are so much smarter than adults!)

6. The Girl On The Train by Paula Hawkins
As far as thrillers go, very few have had me so absorbed from the outset. Paula Hawkins storytelling is wonderful, and the conclusion to this psychologically based novel is one of the most intense that I’ve ever read.

7. PS. I Love You by Cecelia Ahern
A love story with death at its centre, this is a heart-wrenching novel that focuses on grief and the importance of friends and family.

8. The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
If you’re looking for a romantic contemporary with fantasy elements, this novel is perfect.: it’s character driven and a beautiful love story.

9. Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman
This dystopian is hard-hitting and wonderfully well written. I firmly believe that this is a novel that everyone should read: it is powerful and (unsettlingly) relevant.

10. A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin
There’s something about being sucked into a new fantasy world that is exciting and enthralling: this novel features an eclectic cast of characters, and a quest for control of the empire.

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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‘The Wide Window’ by Lemony Snicket [Book Review]

Today, I finally finished reading the third volume in A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket: The Wide Window for the 2017 Reading Challenge. Although I didn’t particularly enjoy either of the first two stories, it is undeniable that the tales are amusing and easy to read.

Title: The Wide Window
Author: Lemony Snicket
Released: 2000
Pages: 232
Category: #11 A book by an author who uses a pseudonym
Rating: 4/10

[PHOTO]

Review:
“Frustration is an interesting emotional state, because it tends to bring out the worst in whoever is frustrated.”

The third tale in the A Series of Unfortunate Events saga concerns siblings Violet, Klaus and Sunny’s introduction to their Aunt Josephine, in search of their forever home. Having previously been thwarted twice by their evil relation Count Olaf, the children are hopeful for a happy ending – of course, that was never going to happen.

As with the preceding volumes, the plot is simply ridiculous. All the adults in the Baudelaire’s lives are incompetent fools (though this is part of the appeal for children), and the method of delivery is nothing if not unique.

Considering I have now read three novels in this series, I can safely say that I will never be a fan of Lemony Snicket’s works, however, I can appreciate the benefit of real life lessons incorporated within the fiction. I think this is where my journey with the Baudelaire’s comes to an end: I will assume the worst possible ending for the orphans.

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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