‘Orange Is the New Black’ by Piper Kerman [Book Review]

Today I finished my 38th book of the year and the 2016 Reading Challenge: Orange Is the New Black by Piper Kerman. I’m obsessed with the TV show and when I heard the it was based off a memoir, I knew I had to read it.

Title: Orange Is the New Black
Author: Piper Kerman
Released: 2010
Pages: 344
Category: #54 A book that features a crime other than a murder
Rating: 7/10

Review:
“Do you have to find the evil in yourself in order to truly recognize it in the world?”

Orange Is the New Black is a memoir written by real-life prisoner Piper Kerman. Convicted of a drug offence many years previously, the book follows Piper’s journey from learning that her past has caught up with her, to her release from prison.

This is a detailed account of the US prison system, its flaws, and the true stories of the women that inhabit them. The characters, or rather people, who find themselves incarcerated or working within the establishment proved to be incredibly interesting individuals, and Kerman described their situations beautifully and with pure heart.

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I listened to the audiobook, and it was fantastic! The narrator was first class and the entire memoir was both thought-provoking and entertaining. Until reading this book, I had never really considered the immense issue that is the US prison system: they incarcerate 25% of the world’s prisoners, (despite only making up 5% of the world’s population), which equates to more than 2.3 million people imprisoned. The statistics in this book are simply staggering, and Kerman does an excellent job of highlighting the problems associated with the system, whilst simultaneously addressing the need for reform.

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2 Responses to ‘Orange Is the New Black’ by Piper Kerman [Book Review]

  1. I have a background in criminal justice, so this book sounds fascinating. I have read a few book like this, however they were all written by men. I would be interested in seeing the female prisoner’s perspective!

  2. Pingback: Reading Wrap-Up: October 2016 | charlottebibliophile (It Does Not Do To Dwell On Dreams And Forget To Live)

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