Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Books I Plan To Read On The Beach This Summer

May 23: Top Ten Books I Plan To Read On The Beach This Summer
Happy summer! It certainly feels much more like summer to me: the weather has improved and my university term has ended. As a result, I intend to spend the next 14 weeks reading some of the following books (and relaxing with family and friends)!

1. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
This appears to be the book to read in YA at the moment, and I’m nothing if not a sheep in these situations: I too will be reading this one this summer.

2. Nomad by James Swallow
Dubbed the next I Am Pilgrim, I’ve been saving this thriller for the summer. I can’t wait to get to it.

3. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
I was supposed to read this at A Level but I never did. Now with the TV series about to air in the UK, I want to finally right that wrong.

4. Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo
With the conclusion of the duology having now been published, I think it’s time to see what all the fuss is about.

5. 1984 by George Orwell
Another book I was supposed to read at A Level, I don’t think there has ever been a more appropriate political time to read this work.

6. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson 
I’ve been wanting to read this novel for years but it’s never been the right time: I think this summer might be the time to get stuck into some thrillers.

7. Noah Can’t Even by Simon James Green
This YA novel has been receiving huge hype over the past few months, and now that it’s finally been released it’s time to find out what it’s all about.

8. We Come Apart by Sarah Crossan and Brian Conaghan
I adore Sarah Crossan’s writing style and her exceptional plots, so I definitely want to read this one before YALC in July.

9. Release by Patrick Ness
Having read my first Patrick Ness novel last year (A Monster Calls) and having seen him speak at YALC, I really want to discover more of this author.

10. Various Classics by Various Authors
I may be cheating slightly with this one, but with the completion of my penultimate MA essay, I am now free for a summer of reading, and I want to get to a number of classics along with my regular reading. Yesterday I purchased: Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, so I hope to get a few checked off the list.

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Best and Worst Mothers In Literature

May 16: Top Ten Best and Worst Mothers In Literature
When I was thinking about this topic, the number of appalling mothers (or parental figures in general) that ran through my mind was strangely unsettling, but I thought I should even it up, given that this week’s topic is specifically for mother’s day (in the USA).

Worst
1. Flora’s mother (The One Memory Of Flora Banks by Emily Barr)
Whilst I’m unable to discuss why she’s such a horrific mother, just take my word for it.

2. Astrid’s mother (Ask The Passengers by A.S. King)
She couldn’t be less understanding of her daughter’s sexual identity crisis, and is just a thoroughly self-involved individual.

3. Matilda’s mother (Matilda by Roald Dahl)
Who leaves their young child home alone all day, every day? What a terrible woman.

4. Maddie’s mother (Everything Everything by Nicola Yoon)
Another instance I am unable to discuss, but this was such a plot twist.

5. Bridget’s mother (Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding)
Although she’s not inherently bad, she does annoy me profusely. If she were my mother I think I’d react much worse than Bridget.

Best
6. Ron’s mother (Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling)
Molly is one of my favourite characters from the entire Potter series; she is the mother Harry never had, and loves him as one of her own.

7. Mia’s mother (The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot)
Despite hiding the fact she was a princess from her since birth, Mia’s mum did it for the right reasons: to let her daughter grow up away from the trials and tribulations her royal blood would have placed upon her young shoulders. She’s also super funny and sassy.

8. Rosie’s mother (Where Rainbow’s End by Cecelia Ahern)
Incredibly supportive, loving and helpful, Rosie’s mum is the embodiment of everything a mother should be.

9. Bella’s mother (Twilight by Stephenie Meyer)
I love how quirky Bella’s mum is, and how she isn’t afraid to be herself. Technically she might not have been the best “mother”, but no one can deny her love for her daughter.

10. Charlie’s mother (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl)
You can’t get much more loving than starving yourself to feed your child.

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Things On My Reading Wish List

May 9: Top Ten Things On My Reading Wish List
There are too many things on my reading wish list – I suppose I could’ve listed physical objects: new books, bookcases, bookish swag, but instead I focused primarily on the abstract concepts literature addresses.

1. LGBT characters whose sexual orientation isn’t the plot of the novel
Can’t we just have some characters who simply are gay but we just get on with the story? I swear it never happens! The only example I can think of isn’t even from a novel – Clarke from The 100 TV series – she’s bisexual but it’s never mentioned, nor is it an issue.

2. More parents/elders present in YA
Seriously, where are they all? Too many books star orphaned children, or if they do live with adults they seem mysteriously absent. They don’t even need to play a significant role, it would just be nice (and more accurate) to witness their presence.

3. Cut the filler
One of my major reading pet-peeves is waffle: please can we just condense a 500 page book into 300? There’s no need for such tomes, especially in contemporary.

4. More male/female friendships, and friendships that take precedent over relationships
Fewer relationships, more friendships. I swear they are underrepresented in literature.

5. More multiple POV, multiple author novels
I really like reading books written by more than one author, especially when each author is responsible for a different character’s point of view – think Dash and Lily’s Book of Dares, How To Be Bad etc.

6. Fewer happy endings
How does the girl always get the guy? Why does good always overpower evil? Sometimes these things don’t happen, and it would be nice to experience it in literature.

7. Longer sentences
I really don’t like short, snappy sentences: give me a dozen commas any day. I find books much easier to digest when the syntax flows.

8. Fewer love triangles/squares/octagons
Primarily because I’m usually rooting for the underdog, and he/she never wins! I wouldn’t mind so much if on occasion the protagonist loses the battle.

9. More free verse tales
I recently attended a seminar at the London Book Fair 2017 with author Sarah Crossan on the panel. She was speaking about the difficulty in pitching free verse stories for a YA audience to publishers, but readers were not the ones with an issue with the style. Keep up publishers!

10. New J.K. Rowling/Robert Galbraith books
Literally, give me anything Jo! I will purchase multiple copies and devour it, like yesterday.

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Most Aesthetically Pleasing Covers On My TBR

May 2: Top Ten Most Aesthetically Pleasing Covers On My TBR
This week’s TTT was a cover related freebie, and being the superficial individual (when talking about books) I am, I decided to list some of the most beautiful covers of books (complete with mini Goodreads descriptions) I own that I’ve yet to read.

1. A Thousand Pieces Of You by Claudia Gray
“Cloud Atlas meets Orphan Black in this epic dimension-bending trilogy by New York Times bestselling author Claudia Gray about a girl who must chase her father’s killer through multiple dimensions.”

2. These Broken Stars by Aime Kaufman and Meagan Spooner
“Luxury spaceliner Icarus suddenly plummets from hyperspace into the nearest planet. Lilac LaRoux and Tarver Merendsen survive – alone. Lilac is the daughter of the richest man in the universe. Tarver comes from nothing, a cynical war hero. Both journey across the eerie deserted terrain for help. Everything changes when they uncover the truth.”

3. The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury
“Sixteen-year-old Twylla lives in the castle. But although she’s engaged to the prince, no one speaks to her. No one even looks at her. Because Twylla isn’t a member of the court. She’s the executioner.”

4. Furthermore by Tahereh Mafi
“Inspired by her childhood love of books like The Secret Garden and The Chronicles of Narnia, bestselling author Tahereh Mafi crafts a spellbinding new world where color is currency, adventure is inevitable, and friendship is found in the most unexpected places.”

5. Rebel Belle by Rachel Hawkins
“Harper Price, peerless Southern belle, was born ready for a Homecoming tiara. But after a strange run-in at the dance imbues her with incredible abilities, Harper’s destiny takes a turn for the seriously weird. She becomes a Paladin, one of an ancient line of guardians with agility, super strength and lethal fighting instincts.”

6. Magonia by Maria Dahvana Headley
“Since she was a baby, Aza has suffered from a mysterious lung disease that makes it ever harder for her to breathe, to speak—to live.”

7. The Marvels by Brian Selznick
“Two seemingly unrelated stories–one in words, the other in pictures–come together. The illustrated story begins in 1766 with Billy Marvel, the lone survivor of a shipwreck, and charts the adventures of his family of actors over five generations. The prose story opens in 1990 and follows Joseph, who has run away from school to an estranged uncle’s puzzling house in London, where he, along with the reader, must piece together many mysteries.”

8. The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin
“After her best friend dies in a drowning accident, Suzy is convinced that the true cause of the tragedy must have been a rare jellyfish sting-things don’t just happen for no reason. Retreating into a silent world of imagination, she crafts a plan to prove her theory–even if it means traveling the globe, alone. Suzy’s achingly heartfelt journey explores life, death, the astonishing wonder of the universe…and the potential for love and hope right next door.”

9. Reign of Shadows by Sophie Jordan
“Seventeen years ago, an eclipse cloaked the kingdom of Relhok in perpetual darkness. In the chaos, an evil chancellor murdered the king and queen and seized their throne. Luna, Relhok’s lost princess, has been hiding in a tower ever since. Luna’s survival depends on the world believing she is dead.”

10. Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge
“Based on the classic fairy tale Beauty and the Beast, Cruel Beauty is a dazzling love story about our deepest desires and their power to change our destiny.”

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly Not Want To Read A Book

April 25: Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly Not Want To Read A Book
Prior to writing this week’s TTT, I didn’t think that there was a great deal of book turn-offs for me: I was wrong.

1. Required reading 
There’s just something about having to read a book that immediately makes me not want to read it.

2. More than 600 pages
Long books require some serious planning for me to read. I’m generally more in the market for books under 350 pages that I can speed through if I love them.

3. Photograph on the cover
Pet peeve, but I hate photos of people on covers (I can live with cartoon depictions): it’s an instant no from me.

4. In a long series
If I have to commit to a series of four or more books, I’m immediately put off, even if I’ve read book one.

5. Disliked the writing style
I’ve been known to sit down with a book only to toss it aside after only a few sentences (I’m looking at you, The Chemist by Stephenie Meyer) if the writing is terrible.

6. After finishing a really great/intense read
It often takes me a while to get back into reading once I’ve finished an amazing book; I just step away for a week or two.

7. Historical fiction
Bore off. I don’t care what time period it’s set in, I’m really not interested.

8. Friend disliked it
They have to be a good friend who I trust with my recommendations, but if they hated it, I’m not reading it.

9. Too much hype
Sometimes I’m all on the hype, but sometimes it scares me to the extent that I don’t want to read the book.

10. Written by politicians
Urgh. I wasn’t interested in your life when you were in power, and I’m certainly not interested in your life now.

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly Want To Read A Book

April 18: Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly Want To Read A Book
There isn’t often a time when I don’t want to read a book (at least to some degree), but there are occasions that increase my desire tenfold.

1. Watching a TV show/movie that mentions/shows a specific book
Gilmore Girls is a prime example: Rory is always reading something, and I always think “I want to read that. Like immediately.”

2. Watching a TV show/movie based on a book
The most recent example of this was when I watched The Martian. I already owned the book but hadn’t had any particular desire to read it. Fast-forward two hours and my nose was buried in the pages.

3. Seeing someone read a book in public
There’s something about watching someone with their nose in a book that instantly makes me want to do the same.

4. A new release by a favourite author
If JKR is releasing a new book, I’ll be up and ready to dive into it at midnight: time for a new novel now, isn’t it Jo?!

5. Sitting on a sunbed on holiday
Whenever I’m on holiday having a book in my hands is a prerequisite (even before the cocktail!) I fly through novels at the rate of knots whilst sitting in the sun.

6. When it has received stellar reviews on social media
If I’ve seen beautiful Instabooks photos, or read positive Goodreads reviews, I need that book.

7. When I should be doing something (arguably) more productive
Essay to write? Read a book.

8. After an author event
Frequently after meeting an author at an event or signing, if I haven’t already read the relevant book, it’s the first thing on my to-do-list.

9. It’s recommended to me by a friend, author or bookstore employee
In person recommendations are the best, and are a sure-fire way to get me to buy books.

10. Insane hype
The most recent example is Thirteen Reasons Why, which I devoured once it hit Netflix (before I began watching the show).

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Of The Most Unique Books I’ve Read

April 11: Top Ten Of The Most Unique Books I’ve Read
Whilst each book is unique, there are a number of books that stick in my mind as being especially different.

1. Nod by Adrian Barnes
Right up there with the strangest books I’ve ever read, this novel explores the concept of societal collapse due to the inability to sleep.

2. The One Memory Of Flora Banks by Emily Barr
This YA novel follows amnesiac Flora on her day to day life: it is full of repetition (understandable given the concept), but has a great plot twist.

3. A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness
This YA novel utilises magical realism in order to tackle important themes including bullying and death.

4. One by Sarah Crossan
Told in free verse, this YA story tells the tale of conjoined twins, their relationship, and the challenges they face.

5. Foe by J.M. Coetzee
The magical realism featured in this novel is incredibly thought provoking: concerning what is real and what is imagined, it is open to a vast array of interpretations.

6. The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
With one of the most interesting narrators, this series is amusing and holds relevant life lessons for both young and old.

7. We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
That plot twist! You think you know the direction this novel is heading in, and then, bam!

8. The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Whilst not an unusual YA dystopian concept, the lexis and syntax used in this book are wildly different to anything I’ve ever read before, which took a bit of getting used to.

9. The Curious Incident of the Dog In the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
Told from the perspective of a teenage boy with autism, the novel follows Christopher solving a crime.

10. Life With No Breaks by Nick Spalding
This entire book was written in one sitting: 24 hours in front of a computer is probably enough to drive anyone insane, and some of the tales in this autobiographical account are certainly hilarious.

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Check out their blog and get involved!

For more content, visit @charlottebibliophile on Goodreads, Instagram and YouTube

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